The Marchetti Art Gallery was founded in 1997 in Rome, in Via Margutta, with the aim of thoroughly studying the identity profile of contemporary art, and to offer the public its multiple expressions.

The programmatic choices of the gallery in almost 25 years of activity show an interest both for the contemporary as linguistic research and experimentation (with artists such as Asdrubali, Fiorelli, Magnoni, Notargiacomo, Pinelli, Radi, Salvatori, Spagnulo, Staccioli …), and for the “historicized” contemporary, both in its aniconic variants (of particular interest are the exhibitions created on the artists of Forma1, such as Accardi, Sanfilippo, Perilli, Turcato, Dorazio, or on a master of the European informal such as Boille), as well as in the figurative ones, with masters such as De Chirico, Severini, Guttuso, Gentilini, E. Greco, Music, Pirandello or Maccari, perhaps the greatest Italian expressionist (important exhibition held in 2014 for the 25th anniversary of his death ).
The research on the Roman environment has been gradually deepened, with artists such as Mafai, Raphaël, Stradone, Monachesi, Ziveri, and above all on the “Scuola di Piazza del Popolo” of the 60s (Angeli, Festa Schifano, Lombardo, Mambor, Heels …).
The main purpose of the Gallery is therefore to relate the history of the twentieth century in a stimulating and vital way, as a set of ideas and creative acts settled over time, and the present of art, its most immediate topicality, its various ways of being “current”. A search for “modernity” and its essence through the work of several generations of artists, all intent in their own way to try to understand and express the complexity of what could perhaps still be called “beauty”.

The programmatic choices of the gallery in almost 25 years of activity show an interest both for the contemporary as linguistic research and experimentation (with artists such as Asdrubali, Fiorelli, Magnoni, Notargiacomo, Pinelli, Radi, Salvatori, Spagnulo, Staccioli …), and for the “historicized” contemporary, both in its aniconic variants (of particular interest are the exhibitions created on the artists of Forma1, such as Accardi, Sanfilippo, Perilli, Turcato, Dorazio, or on a master of the European informal such as Boille), as well as in the figurative ones, with masters such as De Chirico, Severini, Guttuso, Gentilini, E. Greco, Music, Pirandello or Maccari, perhaps the greatest Italian expressionist (important exhibition held in 2014 for the 25th anniversary of his death ).
The research on the Roman environment has been gradually deepened, with artists such as Mafai, Raphaël, Stradone, Monachesi, Ziveri, and above all on the “Scuola di Piazza del Popolo” of the 60s (Angeli, Festa Schifano, Lombardo, Mambor, Heels …).
The main purpose of the Gallery is therefore to relate the history of the twentieth century in a stimulating and vital way, as a set of ideas and creative acts settled over time, and the present of art, its most immediate topicality, its various ways of being “current”. A search for “modernity” and its essence through the work of several generations of artists, all intent in their own way to try to understand and express the complexity of what could perhaps still be called “beauty”.

Our Exhibitions

The first exhibition, held in 1998 and dedicated to Gianni Asdrubali, already reveals, together with two others held the same year – the personal exhibitions of Gianfranco Notargiacomo and Pino Pinelli – one of the main orientations of the gallery: that towards the aniconic dimension of art, abstractionism in all its varieties and nuances. This is fully confirmed the following year, 1999, with the beginning of the collaboration with Luigi Boille, one of the historical masters of the European informal, who lived in Paris since 1950, close to the Ecole de Paris and included by the great critic Michel Tapié in the ‘Art Autre group. The Marchetti Gallery is proud to have dedicated eight personal exhibitions to him: 1999, 2001, 2002 ( Selected works of the 1960s ), 2007 ( In the sign of infinity ), 2009 ( Fluctuations. Works 1953-2009 ), 2012 ( The purest possible painting – Works 1952 -2012), 2013 ( Sign and color beyond postmodernism, double solo show, with Eliseo Sonnino), and the retrospective of 2015, immediately after his death ( “To meet places of light “).
The path traced by the Galleria Marchetti through the creative parable of Luigi Boille is essential and significant: from the works of the very early 1950s – in full informal period – to those of the extreme expressive phase, in progress up to in the last days of the painter’s life.
The new millennium opens with an exhibition by Achille Perilli, another recurring artist in the exhibition activity of the Marchetti gallery (his last solo show, held in 2019, closes the phase preceding the 2020 pandemic).
The solo show dedicated to Perilli in the year 2000 inaugurates the gallery’s interest in the artists of the Forma1 group: besides Perilli himself, Accardi, Consagra, Dorazio, Sanfilippo, and above all Giulio Turcato.
The Forma1 movement (born in 1947) slightly anticipated the Milanese phenomenon of the MAC, and was defined by Cesare Vivaldi as “an act of courage and awareness”, arising from the need to create a current art that included the Italian art in the vein of the great European current. Initially the common influences (Cézanne and Matisse, Picasso and Braque, Mondrian and Kandisnkij, Futurism, the Russian avant-garde and the Bauhaus …) gave the works of the individual members of the group a very similar physiognomy, but subsequently the various personalities developed very diversified, examined by the Marchetti gallery over the years.

This interest will also materialize in the exhibition Starting from Forma1 Paths in abstract art by Accardi Consagra Dorazio Perilli Sanfilippo Turcato , (2012), with a Tribute to Giulio Turcato on the centenary of his birth (1912-2012) , in collaboration with the Archivio dell’Opera by Giulio Turcato, whose documentary and scientific contribution the gallery has repeatedly made use of. He was thus also able to count on the loan, by the Heirs, of several interesting unpublished works by this artist, considered one of the most significant interpreters of pictorial abstraction in the international arena, even if his work includes fascinating figurative implications and extraordinary achievements in the of sculpture and scenography: a very personal rhythmic and dynamic language based on form-color.
Giulio Turcato’s first solo show at the Marchetti gallery was held in 2004, followed by those of 2008, 2011, 2012 and 2021.
Also in 2012 there is an important exhibition event linked to another painter of Forma1, Piero Dorazio: his personal Nel labirinto del colore-luce-Carte 1948-1998, with its catalog, is particularly significant. since for several years no personal exhibitions have been dedicated to the great Italian abstract artist who died in 2005, nor have catalogs of his works published.
A confirmation of the attention paid by Galleria Marchetti to research into abstractionism can also be found in the 2013 exhibition Icons of the invisible. 21 faces of abstraction in contemporary Italian art. Works from the 1950s to the present day, with works attributable to an abstraction of gesture, of sign or matter, or to an abstraction of a geometric type. The exhibition thus takes on a both historical and research profile, focusing the public’s attention on some artists of the contemporary Italian context – at the time all living and operational – with paths that can be traced back to the articulated and multiform way of abstraction, paths that in evidence the persistence of the vitality of this artistic language: from Carla Accardi to Nanni Balestrini, from Gianni Asdrubali to Gianfranco Notargiacomo, from Luigi Boille to Edoardo Landi, to Achille Perilli, to Mauro Staccioli, but also interesting emerging figures, now fully established, like Alberto di Fabio, Sidival Fila, Licia Galizia, Antonella Zazzera.

In some respects, this exhibition is linked to the collective Multidimensionale – Artists beyond the Euclidean space of autumn 2020 (the first after the health emergency due to Covid-19), a collective of eight artists For a long time present in the gallery: Asdrubali, Boille, Fiorelli, Lombardo, Magnoni, Notargiacomo, Pinelli, Radi. All artists who – beyond generational, technical and stylistic differences – have expressed in their work an idea of ​​art as tension it continues between thought and physical reality, orienting itself towards the search for a perceptive and rational impact on the viewer.

One of the very first exhibitions of the Marchetti gallery, in 1998, is dedicated to Sergio Lombardo – leading exponent of the so-called “Scuola di Piazza del Popolo” – who will return to exhibit here in the personal exhibitions of 2002 and 2005, and in numerous group exhibitions, where his works often appear alongside those of friends and colleagues Renato Mambor and Cesare Tacchi, also well-known members of the group. The works in the collection and the exhibition program of the Marchetti Gallery reveal a particular interest in that movement and for the years in which it had established itself.
Between the 50s and the 60s, many artists met in Rome, who “knew how to absorb the extraordinary climate of the city, creating a style poised between work, behavior, material and image, between commitment and nihilism” (Fabio Mauri) . Usually they were joined by writers such as Moravia, Pasolini, Flaiano, Parise, Emilio Villa …
The image of a Rome closed in on itself that has sometimes spread is completely false, as evidenced for example by the biography of Franco Angeli, who accredits, through the numerous correspondence exchanges published, the thesis of a city open on the stage of the world, in a role by no means subordinate to that of New York. In Rome there were also many American artists: Rauschenberg, Rothko, De Kooning, Kline, Twombly … Because then “America was in Rome”, as stated by the gallery owner Plinio De Martiis, who with his Galleria La Tartaruga had given an extraordinary impulse to the new artistic climate, and to which the Galleria Marchetti has dedicated a significant tribute. In fact, in October 2014 the “beautiful exhibition Italian Turtle Artists – in the tenth anniversary of the death of Plinio De Martiis” was inaugurated in the Gallery, as defined in the 2021 edition of the historic “Repubblica” Guide dedicated to Rome and Lazio: an exhibition homage to the great Roman gallery owner, ten years after his death, and to his legendary gallery (active in Rome from 1954 to 1984), with works (some completely unpublished) of 31 of the most prestigious Italian artists who exhibited at the Tartaruga between the 50s and the 80s: Franco Angeli, Ugo Attardi, Luigi Boille, Giuseppe Capogrossi, Antonio Corpora, Stefano Di Stasio, Piero Dorazio, Tano Festa, Lucio Fontana, Sergio Lombardo, Mino Maccari, Mario Mafai, Renato Mambor, Titina Maselli, Eliseo Mattiacci, Sante Monachesi, Marcello Muccini, Gianfranco Notargiacomo, Gastone Novelli, Giovanni Omiccioli, Achille Perilli, Fausto Pirandello, Antonietta Raphaël, Mimmo Rotella, Giuseppe Santomaso, Mario Schifano, Antonio Scordia, Cesare Tacchi, Giulio Turcato, Antonio Vangelli, Emilio Vedova.

At the dawn of the 1960s, the critic Cesare Vivaldi wrote, “a new generation of Roman painters is impetuously coming to the fore”: an artistic generation “of early maturation and with more organic and compact characteristics than the previous two”. Vivaldi mentioned some names, focusing in particular on those of Franco Angeli, Tano Festa and Mario Schifano: these three artists – all at the time strongly linked to the De Martiis gallery – are among those who best characterize the so-called “school of Piazza del Popolo ”(Often made to coincide with“ Italian Pop Art ”), and which, despite having looked with great attention to contemporary overseas experiences, have always shown their marked originality in terms of themes, ideological positions and technical ability. The Marchetti gallery has paid particular attention to these in recent years, with the organization of various solo exhibitions and the inclusion of their works in the gallery’s collective, helping to compensate for the lack of attention for a long time encountered by certain critics , for a phenomenon as complex and important as the Scuola di piazza del Popolo, often neglected, compared to other movements (such as Arte Povera), later and characterized by elements already present in the poetics of these artists.

A not inconsiderable place, in the collecting practice and in the exhibition activity of the Marchetti Gallery, is occupied by sculpture. The first important sculpture exhibition in 2006 was dedicated to the refined and rigorous abstractionism of Teodosio Magnoni, followed in 2007 by the personal exhibitions of two as great as different sculptors, Carlo Lorenzetti, with his aerial rarefactions and luminous vibrations, and Giuseppe Spagnulo, with the primeval and earthy strength of his material structures, artists who in the following years maintained a constant presence in the gallery.

In 2011, an interesting parenthesis is the personal exhibition dedicated to a great outsider such as the sculptor of Lucanian origin Giacinto Cerone, for whom the sculpture is the result of a harsh contrast of inner forces: < em> Giacinto Cerone. Coroplastica dell’inquietudine with several extraordinary ceramic works and some unpublished large-scale works on paper, where visionary imagination and realistic expressive violence were intertwined.

In May 2016 the Galleria Marchetti sets up a solo exhibition of one of the greatest contemporary sculptors, Mauro Staccioli: Mauro Staccioli – “Creating sculpture means existing in a place”. The exhibition – created in collaboration with the Mauro Staccioli Archive – featured a dozen sculptures, including some unpublished – such as the great “crescent” Untitled from 2004 – and about twenty of beautiful papers (acrylic and graphite on paper) of large dimensions, to underline the importance of drawing as a premise and at the same time autonomous and contiguous “place” to that of sculpture. The exhibition was Staccioli’s last solo exhibition held in a private living gallery by the artist (unfortunately passed away on January 1, 2018).

Our Exhibitions

The first exhibition, held in 1998 and dedicated to Gianni Asdrubali, already reveals, together with two others held the same year – the personal exhibitions of Gianfranco Notargiacomo and Pino Pinelli – one of the main orientations of the gallery: that towards the aniconic dimension of art, abstractionism in all its varieties and nuances. This is fully confirmed the following year, 1999, with the beginning of the collaboration with Luigi Boille, one of the historical masters of the European informal, who lived in Paris since 1950, close to the Ecole de Paris and included by the great critic Michel Tapié in the ‘Art Autre group. The Marchetti Gallery is proud to have dedicated eight personal exhibitions to him: 1999, 2001, 2002 ( Selected works of the 1960s ), 2007 ( In the sign of infinity ), 2009 ( Fluctuations. Works 1953-2009 ), 2012 ( The purest possible painting – Works 1952 -2012), 2013 ( Sign and color beyond postmodernism, double solo show, with Eliseo Sonnino), and the retrospective of 2015, immediately after his death ( “To meet places of light “).
The path traced by the Galleria Marchetti through the creative parable of Luigi Boille is essential and significant: from the works of the very early 1950s – in full informal period – to those of the extreme expressive phase, in progress up to in the last days of the painter’s life.
The new millennium opens with an exhibition by Achille Perilli, another recurring artist in the exhibition activity of the Marchetti gallery (his last solo show, held in 2019, closes the phase preceding the 2020 pandemic).
The solo show dedicated to Perilli in the year 2000 inaugurates the gallery’s interest in the artists of the Forma1 group: besides Perilli himself, Accardi, Consagra, Dorazio, Sanfilippo, and above all Giulio Turcato.
The Forma1 movement (born in 1947) slightly anticipated the Milanese phenomenon of the MAC, and was defined by Cesare Vivaldi as “an act of courage and awareness”, arising from the need to create a current art that included the Italian art in the vein of the great European current. Initially the common influences (Cézanne and Matisse, Picasso and Braque, Mondrian and Kandisnkij, Futurism, the Russian avant-garde and the Bauhaus …) gave the works of the individual members of the group a very similar physiognomy, but subsequently the various personalities developed very diversified, examined by the Marchetti gallery over the years.

This interest will also materialize in the exhibition Starting from Forma1 Paths in abstract art by Accardi Consagra Dorazio Perilli Sanfilippo Turcato , (2012), with a Tribute to Giulio Turcato on the centenary of his birth (1912-2012) , in collaboration with the Archivio dell’Opera by Giulio Turcato, whose documentary and scientific contribution the gallery has repeatedly made use of. He was thus also able to count on the loan, by the Heirs, of several interesting unpublished works by this artist, considered one of the most significant interpreters of pictorial abstraction in the international arena, even if his work includes fascinating figurative implications and extraordinary achievements in the of sculpture and scenography: a very personal rhythmic and dynamic language based on form-color.
Giulio Turcato’s first solo show at the Marchetti gallery was held in 2004, followed by those of 2008, 2011, 2012 and 2021.
Also in 2012 there is an important exhibition event linked to another painter of Forma1, Piero Dorazio: his personal Nel labirinto del colore-luce-Carte 1948-1998, with its catalog, is particularly significant. since for several years no personal exhibitions have been dedicated to the great Italian abstract artist who died in 2005, nor have catalogs of his works published.
A confirmation of the attention paid by Galleria Marchetti to research into abstractionism can also be found in the 2013 exhibition Icons of the invisible. 21 faces of abstraction in contemporary Italian art. Works from the 1950s to the present day, with works attributable to an abstraction of gesture, of sign or matter, or to an abstraction of a geometric type. The exhibition thus takes on a both historical and research profile, focusing the public’s attention on some artists of the contemporary Italian context – at the time all living and operational – with paths that can be traced back to the articulated and multiform way of abstraction, paths that in evidence the persistence of the vitality of this artistic language: from Carla Accardi to Nanni Balestrini, from Gianni Asdrubali to Gianfranco Notargiacomo, from Luigi Boille to Edoardo Landi, to Achille Perilli, to Mauro Staccioli, but also interesting emerging figures, now fully established, like Alberto di Fabio, Sidival Fila, Licia Galizia, Antonella Zazzera.

In some respects, this exhibition is linked to the collective Multidimensionale – Artists beyond the Euclidean space of autumn 2020 (the first after the health emergency due to Covid-19), a collective of eight artists For a long time present in the gallery: Asdrubali, Boille, Fiorelli, Lombardo, Magnoni, Notargiacomo, Pinelli, Radi. All artists who – beyond generational, technical and stylistic differences – have expressed in their work an idea of ​​art as tension it continues between thought and physical reality, orienting itself towards the search for a perceptive and rational impact on the viewer.

One of the very first exhibitions of the Marchetti gallery, in 1998, is dedicated to Sergio Lombardo – leading exponent of the so-called “Scuola di Piazza del Popolo” – who will return to exhibit here in the personal exhibitions of 2002 and 2005, and in numerous group exhibitions, where his works often appear alongside those of friends and colleagues Renato Mambor and Cesare Tacchi, also well-known members of the group. The works in the collection and the exhibition program of the Marchetti Gallery reveal a particular interest in that movement and for the years in which it had established itself.
Between the 50s and the 60s, many artists met in Rome, who “knew how to absorb the extraordinary climate of the city, creating a style poised between work, behavior, material and image, between commitment and nihilism” (Fabio Mauri) . Usually they were joined by writers such as Moravia, Pasolini, Flaiano, Parise, Emilio Villa …
The image of a Rome closed in on itself that has sometimes spread is completely false, as evidenced for example by the biography of Franco Angeli, who accredits, through the numerous correspondence exchanges published, the thesis of a city open on the stage of the world, in a role by no means subordinate to that of New York. In Rome there were also many American artists: Rauschenberg, Rothko, De Kooning, Kline, Twombly … Because then “America was in Rome”, as stated by the gallery owner Plinio De Martiis, who with his Galleria La Tartaruga had given an extraordinary impulse to the new artistic climate, and to which the Galleria Marchetti has dedicated a significant tribute. In fact, in October 2014 the “beautiful exhibition Italian Turtle Artists – in the tenth anniversary of the death of Plinio De Martiis” was inaugurated in the Gallery, as defined in the 2021 edition of the historic “Repubblica” Guide dedicated to Rome and Lazio: an exhibition homage to the great Roman gallery owner, ten years after his death, and to his legendary gallery (active in Rome from 1954 to 1984), with works (some completely unpublished) of 31 of the most prestigious Italian artists who exhibited at the Tartaruga between the 50s and the 80s: Franco Angeli, Ugo Attardi, Luigi Boille, Giuseppe Capogrossi, Antonio Corpora, Stefano Di Stasio, Piero Dorazio, Tano Festa, Lucio Fontana, Sergio Lombardo, Mino Maccari, Mario Mafai, Renato Mambor, Titina Maselli, Eliseo Mattiacci, Sante Monachesi, Marcello Muccini, Gianfranco Notargiacomo, Gastone Novelli, Giovanni Omiccioli, Achille Perilli, Fausto Pirandello, Antonietta Raphaël, Mimmo Rotella, Giuseppe Santomaso, Mario Schifano, Antonio Scordia, Cesare Tacchi, Giulio Turcato, Antonio Vangelli, Emilio Vedova.

At the dawn of the 1960s, the critic Cesare Vivaldi wrote, “a new generation of Roman painters is impetuously coming to the fore”: an artistic generation “of early maturation and with more organic and compact characteristics than the previous two”. Vivaldi mentioned some names, focusing in particular on those of Franco Angeli, Tano Festa and Mario Schifano: these three artists – all at the time strongly linked to the De Martiis gallery – are among those who best characterize the so-called “school of Piazza del Popolo ”(Often made to coincide with“ Italian Pop Art ”), and which, despite having looked with great attention to contemporary overseas experiences, have always shown their marked originality in terms of themes, ideological positions and technical ability. The Marchetti gallery has paid particular attention to these in recent years, with the organization of various solo exhibitions and the inclusion of their works in the gallery’s collective, helping to compensate for the lack of attention for a long time encountered by certain critics , for a phenomenon as complex and important as the Scuola di piazza del Popolo, often neglected, compared to other movements (such as Arte Povera), later and characterized by elements already present in the poetics of these artists.

A not inconsiderable place, in the collecting practice and in the exhibition activity of the Marchetti Gallery, is occupied by sculpture. The first important sculpture exhibition in 2006 was dedicated to the refined and rigorous abstractionism of Teodosio Magnoni, followed in 2007 by the personal exhibitions of two as great as different sculptors, Carlo Lorenzetti, with his aerial rarefactions and luminous vibrations, and Giuseppe Spagnulo, with the primeval and earthy strength of his material structures, artists who in the following years maintained a constant presence in the gallery.

In 2011, an interesting parenthesis is the personal exhibition dedicated to a great outsider such as the sculptor of Lucanian origin Giacinto Cerone, for whom the sculpture is the result of a harsh contrast of inner forces: < em> Giacinto Cerone. Coroplastica dell’inquietudine with several extraordinary ceramic works and some unpublished large-scale works on paper, where visionary imagination and realistic expressive violence were intertwined.

In May 2016 the Galleria Marchetti sets up a solo exhibition of one of the greatest contemporary sculptors, Mauro Staccioli: Mauro Staccioli – “Creating sculpture means existing in a place”. The exhibition – created in collaboration with the Mauro Staccioli Archive – featured a dozen sculptures, including some unpublished – such as the great “crescent” Untitled from 2004 – and about twenty of beautiful papers (acrylic and graphite on paper) of large dimensions, to underline the importance of drawing as a premise and at the same time autonomous and contiguous “place” to that of sculpture. The exhibition was Staccioli’s last solo exhibition held in a private living gallery by the artist (unfortunately passed away on January 1, 2018).

Fair events

The Marchetti Art Gallery has participated over the years in major exhibitions of contemporary art, such as ArteFiera in Bologna, MiArt in Milan and ArtVerona.

He has often lent works from his collection to important public exhibitions, including: Antonio Sanfilippo 1923-1980, curated by Fabrizio D’Amico, Museum of Contemporary Art of Trento and Rovereto, Palazzo delle Albere , Trento, 2001-2002 Achille Perilli – Die expressivität des Zeichen (The expressiveness of the sign), edited by Klaus Wolbert, Institut Mathildenhöhe, Darmstadt, Germany, 2005; Italia Arabia – Artistic Convergences between Italy and Egypt, Lebanon, Syria and Iran , Chelsea Art Museum, Manhattan, New York City, 2008; Mimmo Rotella – Décollage and retro d’affiches, curated by Germano Celant, Palazzo Reale, Milan, 2014; Luigi Boille – The infinite sign – Works 1950-2015, retrospective curated by Silvia Pegoraro, Armando Pizzinato Civic Gallery of Contemporary Art, Pordenone, 2016; The myth of Pop – Italian journeys, curated by Silvia Pegoraro, Armando Pizzinato Civic Gallery of Contemporary Art, Pordenone, 2017; Luigi Boille – Places of light, writing of silence – Works 1958-2015, edited by Claudia Terenzi and Bruno Aller, Civic Museums of Villa Torlonia, Rome, 1919.

Fair events

The Marchetti Art Gallery has participated over the years in major exhibitions of contemporary art, such as ArteFiera in Bologna, MiArt in Milan and ArtVerona.

He has often lent works from his collection to important public exhibitions, including: Antonio Sanfilippo 1923-1980, curated by Fabrizio D’Amico, Museum of Contemporary Art of Trento and Rovereto, Palazzo delle Albere , Trento, 2001-2002 Achille Perilli – Die expressivität des Zeichen (The expressiveness of the sign), edited by Klaus Wolbert, Institut Mathildenhöhe, Darmstadt, Germany, 2005; Italia Arabia – Artistic Convergences between Italy and Egypt, Lebanon, Syria and Iran , Chelsea Art Museum, Manhattan, New York City, 2008; Mimmo Rotella – Décollage and retro d’affiches, curated by Germano Celant, Palazzo Reale, Milan, 2014; Luigi Boille – The infinite sign – Works 1950-2015, retrospective curated by Silvia Pegoraro, Armando Pizzinato Civic Gallery of Contemporary Art, Pordenone, 2016; The myth of Pop – Italian journeys, curated by Silvia Pegoraro, Armando Pizzinato Civic Gallery of Contemporary Art, Pordenone, 2017; Luigi Boille – Places of light, writing of silence – Works 1958-2015, edited by Claudia Terenzi and Bruno Aller, Civic Museums of Villa Torlonia, Rome, 1919.

The Gallery has granted on loan to the Ministry of Foreign Affairs for its collection of contemporary art at the Palazzo della Farnesina in Rome (documented by the catalog Italian artists of the twentieth century at the Farnesina, edited by Maurizio Calvesi and Paolo Portoghesi, Rome, 2001), two large canvases by Gianni Asdrubali ( Zoide, 2000, acrylic on canvas, 290×260 cm) and by Gianfranco Notargiacomo ( Allegory, 2000, enamel on canvas with sheet metal, 250×370 cm. He then donated to MUSMA – Museum of Contemporary Sculpture Matera (located in the sixteenth-century Palazzo Pomarici, in the Sassi of Matera, a UNESCO heritage site) a great work by Paolo Radi: Body silence, < / em> from 2003 (wood, acrylic and satin perspex, cm. 200x325x90)

The popular art catalogs of the Marchetti Gallery are published by the Turato Graphic Editions of Padua.

The Gallery has granted on loan to the Ministry of Foreign Affairs for its collection of contemporary art at the Palazzo della Farnesina in Rome (documented by the catalog Italian artists of the twentieth century at the Farnesina, edited by Maurizio Calvesi and Paolo Portoghesi, Rome, 2001), two large canvases by Gianni Asdrubali ( Zoide, 2000, acrylic on canvas, 290×260 cm) and by Gianfranco Notargiacomo ( Allegory, 2000, enamel on canvas with sheet metal, 250×370 cm. He then donated to MUSMA – Museum of Contemporary Sculpture Matera (located in the sixteenth-century Palazzo Pomarici, in the Sassi of Matera, a UNESCO heritage site) a great work by Paolo Radi: Body silence, < / em> from 2003 (wood, acrylic and satin perspex, cm. 200x325x90)

The popular art catalogs of the Marchetti Gallery are published by the Turato Graphic Editions of Padua.

Contemporary art

Artists

Artists